Tens of thousands of people have marched through London and Glasgow in demonstrations against austerity, spending cuts and nuclear weapons.

Austerity.jpg

Singer Charlotte Church and comedian Russell Brand are among those speaking at the event in the capital, alongside Len McCluskey, general secretary of Unite, Labour leadership contender Jeremy Corbyn and Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness.

Organisers estimated that 250,000 people took part in the march from the Bank of England to Westminster. Police would not give an estimate.
A spokesman for the People's Assembly, which is organising the protest, said: "It is clear this march has exceeded all expectations.
"Even the police are estimating that there are 'several hundred thousand' marching.
"Today is not the end of our campaign against austerity but the start of a mass movement prepared to take on this Government."
Church, brandishing an End Austerity Now placard, was at the front of the march.
"I'm here today in a show of solidarity with everyone here - it is a massive turnout - everybody who thinks that austerity isn't the only way and thinks it is essentially unethical, unfair and unnecessary," she said.

Protesters, led by a brass band trio, chanted their opposition to the new Tory Government and its plans for billions of pounds of cuts.
They are the first major public protests since David Cameron was re-elected in May.
One marcher carried a placard showing Mr Cameron peeking out of a garbage can, while another showed him with devil's horns.
Red flares were let off shortly after the march started, filling the streets with scarlet smoke.
More flares were let off as the booing crowd passed Downing Street.

Organisers had promised a "festival atmosphere" and it seemed to be a good-natured march for the most part.
Sian Bloor, a primary school teacher from Trafford, near Manchester, warned that children "are being robbed of their childhood" because of government cuts.
Many trade unionists and public sector workers were among the protesters.
Sian Bloor, a primary school teacher from Trafford, near Manchester, warned that children "are being robbed of their childhood" because of government cuts.
"We have seen a huge impact on our work at primary school," she said.
"I regularly bring clothes and shoes for children and biscuits for their breakfast, just so they get something to eat.
"You can see how children are being affected by the cuts.
"Children come into school concerned because they are being thrown out of their house and have nowhere to live for the upteenth time that year because their parents' benefits are being cut.
"They are being robbed of their childhood."
Waitress Anna Rachel Rowlands told Reuters: "I think there's a genuine need to stop austerity and cuts to the vulnerable."

Kate Hudson, general secretary of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, said mass mobilisation was key to persuading the new Government not to renew the Trident nuclear weapons.
Police Scotland estimated around 1,000 people joined the protest in Glasgow.